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Gilligan DE-508 - History

Gilligan DE-508 - History

Gilligan

John Joseph Gilliagn, Jr., born 17 June 1923 at Newark, N.J., enlisted in the Marine Corps Reserve 8 January 1942 and served at Parris Island, S.C., and Quantico, VA. Private Gilligan was mortally wounded in action while serving with the First Marine Raider Battalion at Tulagi, Solomon Islands, on 7 August 1942 and died the next day. For his heroism under fire, he was posthumoubly awarded the Silver Star.

(DE-508, dp. 11350; 1. 306', b. 36'10", dr. 13'4"
s. 24.3 k, cpl. 222; a. 2.5", 4 40 mm., 10 20 mm., 8 dcp.,
1 dcp. (h.h.), 2dct.; cl. John a. Butler)

Gilligan (D0-508) was launched 22 February 1944 by the Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Newark, N.J.; sponsored by Mrs. John J. Gilligan, the namesake's mother and commissioned 12 May 1944, Lt. Comdr. Carl E. Bull, USNR, commanding.

Following shakedown off Bermuda, Gilligan escorted a troopship from New York to Maine and sailed from Norfolk 5 August 1944 to escort an LSD to Pearl Harbor, arriving 30 August. Underway 29 September to escort merchantmen to Entwetok, she put in at Majuro 13 October and from 16-27 October 1944 escorted merchantmen to Kwajalein, bombarded Mille atoll and Jaluit Island, and sank A 50-foot Japanese schooner, before returning to Majuro the latter date. Gilligan sailed 1 November to escort merchantmen to Eniwetok and Saipan, subsequently mooring at Ulithi 17 November. Three days later, on 20 November, fleet oiler Mississippi—loaded with more than 400 000 gallons of aviation gasoline—was torpedoed inside Ulithi lagoon with a loss of 50 officers and men. Seconds later, Gilligan saw a miniature Japanese submarine pass close alongside; with other ships she depth charged within the lagoon and possibly damaged one midget. Destroyer Case rammed and sank another outside the harbor, and Marine planes finished off a third the same day

Gilligan sailed 4 December as a steamship escort to Manus and conducted patrols off Bougainville from that port until 31 December 1944 when she departed Manus to escort troopships bound for Lingayen Gulf, arriving in time for D-Day, 9 January 1945. Although in constant danger from enemy air attacks, the destroyer escort supported the assault, screened for Attack Group Able of VADM Wilkinson's Task Force 79, and made smoke. Gilligan came under kamikaze attack 12 January. A bluejacket under fire from the attacking plane leaped from his post onto the main battery director and threw it off target, a mistake which prevented the 5-inch guns from getting off more than 14 rounds. The kamikaze crashed directly into the muzzles of Gilligan's No. 2 40mm. gun, killing 12 men and wounding 12, and started raging fires. Outstanding damage control kept the ship seaworthy; she put in at Leyte 17 January for repairs, subsequently reaching Pearl Harbor 21 February for overhaul.

Gilligan sailed again 29 March 1945 as an antisubmarine convoy escort and closed the western beaches of Okinawa 17 April to commence antiaircraft and antisubmarine screening around the transport anchorage. The Japanese were at this time using every conceivable means—kamikazes, submarines, swimmers, and motor boats—to destroy the assembled ships. In spite of heavy air attackS she engaged in screening and escort duties for transports, splashed at least five attacking planes, and possibly damaged a submarine. On 27 May her luck almost ran out; a torpedo bomber hit her solidly with a torpedo, which fortunately was a dud. Gilligan returned to Ulithi 28 June and sailed again 6 July on merchantmen escort duty to Leyte and Hollandia and subsequently closed Manila where she was attached to the Philippine Sea Frontier. On 16 August she sailed to escort merchantmen to Okinawa, returning to Manila 27 August, and repeated this voyage 29 August 25 September 1915. Underway from Manila 5 November, Gilligan reached San Pedro, Calif., 26 November for overhaul. She was towed to San Diego 14 April 1946 and was placed out of commission in reserve at that port 2 July 1946.

Gilligan recommissioned in reserve 15 July 1950 at Seattle and conducting reserve cruises in Pacific Northwest waters, and voyages thence to the Fleet Sonar School at San Diego. Training cruises brought her twice to Hawaii, once to Acapulco, Mexico, and once to the Canal Zone before she decommissioned 31 March 1959 at Point Astoria, Oreg. Gilligan remains out of commission in reserve at Bremerton, Wash.

Gilligan earned one battle star for World War II service.


5 Things You Didn't Know About 'Gilligan's Island,' According To Mary Ann

Premiering in 1964, "Gilligan's Island" had to deal with quite a few more rules than contemporary sitcoms. "There were a lot of restrictions," Dawn Wells, who played Mary Ann Summers in "Gilligan's Island," told The Huffington Post. "Sherwood [the show creator] would talk about having to come to the set to make sure that the cleavage wasn't showing more than 2 seconds, 3 seconds," she said, referring to her character's wardrobe. As outlandish as that now sounds, without the show's characters pushing restraints, "Gilligan's" wouldn't have had quite the same impact on modern television.

Here are a few things you may have never known about Gilligan, the Skipper too, the millionaire and his wife, the movie star, the professor and Mary Ann -- straight from Mary Ann herself.

1. Despite being two of the major characters stranded on the island, Mary Ann and the professor were initially considered extras and omitted from the opening.

In the first season's credits, both Russell Johnson (who played the professor) and Wells were only referred to as "the rest." According to Wells, the two of them joined after the pilot had aired. Pre-existing contractual agreements barred an easy renegotiation of the credits.

But after the first season, Bob Denver, who played Gilligan, remedied this. "Gilligan insisted that there were seven people on the island and took it to the producer and they changed the credits," Wells told HuffPost.

Afterwards, it became a joke. Wells and Johnson embraced the first season title and "always sent each other cards [that said] 'Love, and the rest,'" said Wells.

2. The lagoon was actually filmed next to a busy highway. This constantly forced scenes to be redone when trucks would drive by.

The CBS Studios backlot, where the lagoon from "Gilligan's Island" was filmed, was adjacent to the Hollywood Freeway. This caused quite a few problems when production tried to capture the actors' voices without additional traffic noise.

"I think the soundmen had kind of a hard time with it," said Wells. "I don't know how you would filter that out while we were speaking."

This distraction apparently delayed filming the show. "We had to stop several times because you'd hear trucks go by," Wells added.

3. There was a secret plan to add an animated dinosaur to the cast.

The creator of "Gilligan's Island," Sherwood Schwartz, recalled in his book, Inside Gilligan's Island, a meeting he had with CBS programming executive Hunt Stromberg Jr., who had what could have been a history-altering idea. Rather than Fonzie's 1977 jumping of the shark, we could have had Gilligan's dinosaur.

Stromberg pitched a plot to Schwartz where Gilligan finds a dinosaur and then tames it to keep as a pet. "Just picture it!" Schwartz recalled Stromberg saying. "Gilligan and his pet dinosaur! It's our answer to 'Mr. Ed.'"

This idea never made it to the actors, since Schwartz hated the plan and due to budget constraints.

"Boy, I'm sure glad they didn't go through with that one," Wells told HuffPost.

4. Mary Ann got an enormous amount of fan mail from men, many of whom proposed.

When interviewed by The Vancouver Sun, Wells was asked if the rumor was true that she received 3,000 to 5,000 fan letters a week when she played Mary Ann. Wells said it wasn't quite that many, but certainly more than the rare message in a bottle someone on a stranded island would typically receive.

Wells told HuffPost that those letters did get weird at times. "I'd say some of the fans stretched their imagination quite a bit. It's a very interesting thing with men, because they follow you," she said. One fan recently wrote to remind her that it was their anniversary -- meaning he'd been writing her for 35 years.

"I get proposed to all the time," Wells added.

5. Bob Denver almost died on the set when a lion lunged at him. His immediate reaction was to do something comical.

This was a moment that Wells remembered "very well," since she actually was filming it with an 8mm camera for her own personal home movies.

In the last shot of the day one Friday night, Gilligan was supposed to be stuck in the Howell's hut, piling furniture at the door to keep a lion out, all while the lion was already inside the hut with him. "Even the trainer had claw marks all over him," Wells remembered.

When it came time for Gilligan to notice the lion standing on a pair of twin beds for the scene and try to scurry away, the lion lunged at him in an apparent attempt to become king of the island. As Wells told HuffPost, Denver's immediate reaction was to "karate chop" at the lion.

As the lion lunged, the twin beds split apart and the trainer tackled the lion mid-air. As Denver once recalled, "my hair stood on end."

BONUS: Gilligan's full name was .

Speculation into whether Gilligan had a full name never completely ceased since the show premiered. In the pilot, the character was briefly named Willy Gilligan, but as the show changed dramatically since then, it isn't considered canon. Denver himself felt that the character should only be called Gilligan.

"I really don't think it was Willy Gilligan," Wells told HuffPost. "Everybody says there was no other name."

Wells said that Schwartz gave Gilligan only one name on purpose. He also made the characters wear the same clothes for that same purpose. "[Schwartz] was a genius at comedy, that's why everybody was in the same clothes," Wells said. "Charlie Chaplin always wore the same thing. You identify immediately. I think the one word, Gilligan, was very on purpose. I don't think a last name was necessary at all."


There are 6 census records available for the last name M'gilligan. Like a window into their day-to-day life, M'gilligan census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 1 immigration records available for the last name M'gilligan. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 1,000 military records available for the last name M'gilligan. For the veterans among your M'gilligan ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 6 census records available for the last name M'gilligan. Like a window into their day-to-day life, M'gilligan census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 1 immigration records available for the last name M'gilligan. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 1,000 military records available for the last name M'gilligan. For the veterans among your M'gilligan ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


Gilligan’s Stages of Moral Development

Gilligan outlined her own stages of moral development based on an ethics of care. She used the same levels Kohlberg did but based her stages on interviews with women. Specifically, because Gilligan believed women’s morality arose from real-life dilemmas, not hypothetical ones, she interviewed women trying to decide whether or not to terminate a pregnancy. Her work yielded the following stages:

Stage 1: Pre-Conventional

At the pre-conventional stage, women are focused on the self and emphasize their own self-interests over other considerations.

Stage 2: Conventional

At the conventional stage, women have come to focus on their responsibilities towards others. They are concerned with care for others and being selfless, but this position is defined by society or other people in the woman’s orbit.

Stage 3: Post-Conventional

At the highest stage of moral development, the post-conventional stage, a woman has learned to see herself and others as interdependent. These women have control of their lives and take responsibility for their decisions, a big part of which is the choice to care for others.

Gilligan said that some women may not reach the highest stage of moral development. In addition, she didn't attach specific ages to her stages. However, she did claim that it wasn't experience that drove a woman through the stages, but cognitive ability and the woman’s evolving sense of self.


15 Fateful Facts About Gilligan’s Island

The 98 th —and final—episode of Gilligan’s Island was broadcast on April 17, 1967. Though never a critical favorite, the show was still a solid ratings hit and the cast and crew had every expectation of returning in the fall for a fourth season. But at the last minute CBS needed to find some room on the schedule for Gunsmoke, the favorite show of Babe Paley, wife of network president William Paley. So Gilligan got the axe and, at least as far as viewers know, the cast is still stranded somewhere in the Pacific.

Forty-eight years after that final wrap party, however, Gilligan’s Island is still on the air. It was sold into syndication and has been broadcasting reruns continuously in 30 different languages around the world. Just sit right back and you’ll hear some tales of everyone’s favorite castaways.

1. IT WAS INTENDED TO BE A “METAPHORICAL SHAMING OF WORLD POLITICS.”

One day in a public speaking class at New York University, the professor had students compose an impromptu one-minute speech on this topic: If you were stranded on a desert island, what one item would you like to have? Sherwood Schwartz was a student in that class, and the question so intrigued him that it remained lodged in the back of his mind for many years.

After working for some time as a comedy writer for other shows, Schwartz decided to pitch his own idea for a sitcom. Thinking back to that desert island question, he thought it would make for an interesting dynamic to have a group of very dissimilar individuals stranded together and have to learn to live and work together. The island would be “a social microcosm and a metaphorical shaming of world politics in the sense that when necessary for survival, yes we can all get along,” Schwartz explained in Inside Gilligan's Island: From Creation to Syndication. Schwartz quickly discovered after his first few pitch meetings that words like “microcosm” and “metaphor” were not very helpful when trying to sell a comedy.

2. GILLIGAN’S FIRST NAME IS WILLY.

After getting a green light from CBS for the pilot, Schwartz went about assembling his cast. He chose the name of the bumbling first mate—Gilligan—from the Los Angeles telephone directory. Gilligan’s first name was never mentioned during the series, but according to Schwartz’s original notes, it was intended to be “Willy.” Yet Bob Denver always insisted that “Gilligan” was the character’s first name. “Almost every time I see Bob Denver we still argue,” Schwartz once admitted. “He thinks Gilligan is his first name, and I think it's his last name. Because in the original presentation, it's Willy Gilligan. But he doesn't believe it, and he doesn't want to discuss it. He insists the name is Gilligan.”

3. SCHWARTZ WANTED JERRY VAN DYKE TO PLAY GILLIGAN.

Jerry Van Dyke was Schwartz’s first choice to play the lead, but Van Dyke said that the pilot script was “the worst thing I’d ever read.” On the advice of his agent, Van Dyke accepted the lead in the short-lived (and critically panned) My Mother The Car instead. “I had a lot of problems with the agency, because they were trying to push me into taking [Gilligan’s Island],” Van Dyke recalled in an interview. “But that’s the joke: I turned it down and took My Mother the Car. But, again, it was really good, because I’d [have] been forever known as Gilligan. So that worked out, too!”

4. ALAN HALE GOT TO HIS AUDITION VIA HORSEBACK.

The Skipper was the toughest, and last, character to be cast. Schwartz auditioned dozens of actors (including Carroll O’Connor), but no one was quite right he wanted someone strong and commanding, sometimes blustery and short-tempered, but able to show a genuine affection for Gilligan even when smacking him over the head with his hat. Alan Hale was filming Bullet for a Bad Man in St. George, Utah when he got the casting call for Gilligan and was unable to get time off for a screen test. So he had to sneak off set after a day of filming, which was no easy task. In Surviving Gilligan's Island: The Incredibly True Story of the Longest Three-Hour Tour in History, it was revealed that Hale made his way to Los Angeles to read a scene with Bob Denver via horseback, hitchhiking, airplane, and taxi cab. He reversed the process after the audition and made it back to Utah just in time to resume filming his western the next day.

5. THE ASSASSINATION OF JFK DELAYED PRODUCTION ON THE SERIES.

The pilot for the series was filmed over several days in November of 1963 on the island of Kauai in Hawaii. The last day of shooting was scheduled for November 23, 1963 in Honolulu Harbor for the scenes showing the S.S. Minnow embarking on its fateful three-hour tour. Late in the morning on November 22, a crew member ran to the set and announced that he’d just heard on the radio that President John F. Kennedy had been shot. As Lyndon Johnson was sworn in as President, it was announced that all military installations (including Honolulu Harbor) would be closed for the next two days as a period of mourning. Filming was delayed by several days as a result, and in the opening credits—as the Minnow cruises the harbor—the American flag can be seen flying at half-mast in the background.

6. THE MILLIONAIRE’S WIFE REALLY WAS A MILLIONAIRE.

Natalie Schafer, who played Mrs. Lovey Howell—and allegedly only accepted the invitation to play Mrs. Howell because it meant a free trip to Hawaii to film the pilot—was a real-life millionaire. During her marriage to actor Louis Calhern, the couple had invested heavily in Beverly Hills real estate at a time when a house on Rodeo Drive could be purchased for $50,000.

When she died in 1991, Schafer bequeathed a large chunk of her fortune to her favorite teacup poodle (she had no children), with instructions for that money to be donated to the Motion Picture and Television Hospital after the pooch’s passing. Said hospital now has a "Natalie Schafer Wing." Rumor has it that Schafer also left a tidy sum to Gilligan’s Island co-star Dawn Wells (Mary Ann), who lived with and helped care for Natalie as she battled breast cancer.

7. DAWN WELLS STILL GETS PAID FOR GILLIGAN’S ISLAND.

All of the actors signed contracts that guaranteed them a certain amount of money per original episode plus a residual payment for the first five repeats of each episode. This was a pretty standard contract in 1965, when as a rule most TV shows were only rerun during the summer months as a placeholder between seasons.

Even though the word “syndication” wasn’t yet a standard term in the TV production glossary, Dawn Wells’ then-husband, talent agent Larry Rosen, advised her to ask for an amendment to that residual clause in her contract, and the producers granted it, never thinking the series would be on the air nearly 50 years later. As a result, the estate of the late Sherwood Schwartz (who reportedly pocketed around $90 million during his lifetime from his little microcosm-on-an-island show) and Dawn Wells are the only two folks connected to the show who still receive money from it.

8. RAQUEL WELCH AUDITIONED FOR MARY ANN.

The programming executives at CBS were underwhelmed by the pilot, but it managed to impress three different test audiences enough that they put the series on the fall schedule. But before filming for the first episode began, they had a few caveats—the first of which was replacing three cast members who had tested the “lowest” with audiences: John Gabriel, who played The Professor, a high school science teacher Kit Smythe, who played Ginger as a secretary, not a movie star and Nancy McCarthy, who played Bunny, yet another secretary. It was decided to make Ginger an actress, and Bunny was replaced by wholesome farm girl Mary Ann. One actress who auditioned for Mary Ann’s part was a young Raquel Welch, though something about her just didn’t scream “girl next door.”

9. THE SHOW’S STARS FOUND FANS IN THE STRANGEST PLACES.

Years after the show stopped filming (it’s never really been “off the air”), the cast members found fans in the most unusual places. For example, in 2001 Russell Johnson was asked to speak at a biochemical conference in San Francisco. “There were four or five hundred PhDs there, and every one of them was a Gilligan’s Island fan,” he recalled. Bob Denver took his wife to dinner at Chicago’s elegant Pump Room once and the trio of musicians immediately switched from playing their semi-classical chamber music to “The Ballad of Gilligan’s Island.” Dawn Wells was vacationing in the Solomon Islands in 1990 when she and some friends canoed to a remote island in the area that had no running water or electricity. The visitors were ushered to a hut to meet the village chief, and Wells was stunned when “The chief's wife said, ‘I know you. In 1979, I was going to nursing school in Honiara, the capital of the Solomon Islands, and I used to come home and watch you in black-and-white!’”

10. THE SKIPPER BROKE HIS ARM FALLING OUT OF A COCONUT TREE.

Alan Hale was an old-school “the show must go on” kind of actor. In Inside Gilligan’s Island, Schwartz recalled chatting with Hale at the season one wrap party when the actor, as jolly and convivial as always, happened to comment that now that shooting was completed, he could take care of his arm. When Schwartz asked what was wrong with his arm, Hale nonchalantly replied: “Oh, I broke it a few weeks ago.” He went on to explain that three weeks prior he had missed the crash pads slightly when he fell out of a coconut tree for a scene and had smashed his right arm on the stage. He hadn’t sought medical treatment because he didn’t want to disrupt the filming schedule. Schwartz was dumbfounded “How did you manage to haul coconuts and lift Bob Denver with a broken arm?” “It wasn’t easy,” Hale admitted.

11. NATALIE SCHAFER DID HER OWN STUNTS.

Even though Natalie Schafer was in her mid-60s when Gilligan’s Island was filmed, she insisted on doing the majority of her own stunts—and never complained about jumping into the lagoon or sinking in fake quicksand. In 1965, she told “Let’s Be Beautiful” columnist Arlene Dahl that she kept in shape by swimming in her backyard pool—in the nude—and by periodically following her special “ice cream diet,” which consisted of eating nothing but one quart of ice cream (spread out over three meals) daily. She would lose three pounds in five days following that regime.

12. THE MILLIONAIRE WAS A CHEAPSKATE.

Jim Backus, who played Mr. Howell, was beloved by his castmates. In addition to being the source of endless ribald jokes and a willing coach to the less experienced actors on how to ad-lib or deliver a punch line, he was also notoriously cheap. In What Would Mary Ann Do? A Guide to Life, Dawn Wells recalled how during the show’s first season he would often invite her and Natalie Schafer out to lunch … only to realize that he had left his wallet back at the studio when the check came. Before the cast departed for summer hiatus after the wrap party, Schafer presented Backus with a bill for a little over $300—the total he owed for all those meals.

13. THE PROFESSOR AND MARY ANN WEREN’T IN THE ORIGINAL OPENING CREDITS.

In the first season of Gilligan’s Island, the opening credits ended with a picture of Ginger as the singers crooned “the moo-vie star” followed by a hastily added “and the rest.” The text accompanying the photo proclaimed: “and also starring Tina Louise as ‘Ginger.’” (The only other cast member whose character name was listed in the credits was Jim Backus, a show business veteran and very recognizable character actor whose resume was longer than Ginger’s evening gown.) Louise had had it written into her contract that, along with the “also starring” billing, no one would follow her name in the credits.

Once the show was renewed for a second season, champion-for-the-underdog Bob Denver approached the producers and asked that Russell Johnson and Dawn Wells be added to the opening credits, stating that their characters were just as vital to the dynamic as any of the others. When the producers mentioned the clause in Louise’s contract, Denver countered by referring to a clause in his own contract which stated that he could have his name placed anywhere in the credits he liked. He threatened to have his name moved to last place, so an agreement was hammered out with Louise, a revised theme song was recorded, and Johnson and Wells took their rightful place in the opening montage.

14. THE LAGOON WAS LOCATED IN STUDIO CITY, CALIFORNIA.

The lagoon set was specially built for the show by CBS on their Studio City lot in 1964. They’d originally tried filming two episodes in Malibu, but they had a lot of downtime due to fog. Of course, filming at the studio had its own set of problems sometimes filming had to be halted when traffic noise could be heard from the nearby Ventura Freeway. And the water temperature would hover around 40 degrees during the winter months, forcing Bob Denver to wear a wetsuit under his Gilligan costume. In 1995, the lagoon was turned into an employee parking lot.

15. THE MOVIE STAR WANTED TO BE THE TELEVISION STAR.

In the January 23, 1965 edition of TV Guide, an article about Bob Denver mentioned the on-set tension between Tina Louise and the rest of the castaways: “Denver will not say why he and the glamorous Tina [Louise] do not get along, nor will any of the castaways–they just ignore her, and she ignores them. Between scenes, while the other six principals chat and tell jokes together, she sits off by herself. And recently when Denver was asked to pose for pictures with her, he adamantly refused. Part of Louise’s dissatisfaction with the series was that she had expected to be the star of the show. (Her agent had allegedly pitched it to her as the story of an actress stranded on an island with six other people.)

Bob Denver eventually capitulated to network pressure and agreed to do a photo shoot with Louise for a TV Guide cover in May of 1965—but only if Dawn Wells was included. To his chagrin, Wells was cropped out of the final image.


Gilligan DE-508 - History

Gilligan Funeral Home has been serving Cincinnati area families for years. We are honored to be a part of the rich history of this community and plan to be a part of it for many years to come.

More than a Century of Service in Cincinnati

More than a century of Gilligan Funeral Homes tradition, spanning five generations, began in downtown Cincinnati in 1877. Patrick Gilligan came to America from County Sligo, Ireland, settling in Cincinnati in 1857. He began a livery business, which he developed into P. Gilligan and Sons Undertakers and Embalmers with the help of his sons, Andrew and John. The funeral home was one of the first in the area to offer embalming services. Patrick and Andrew died in 1905, leaving John J. Gilligan to operate the business with the help of his son, Harry J. Gilligan. As his business grew, John purchased the first motorized funeral coach to operate in Cincinnati. He eventually changed the name of the business to John J. Gilligan and Son in 1919. Following family tradition, Harry's three sons, Harry Jr., Frank and John (Jack) Gilligan continued the operation of the business. Harry Jr. and Frank have operated the firm until recently, while John left funeral service to become Governor of Ohio. Currently, Harry J. III and Peter J. Gilligan, sons of Harry J. Gilligan Jr., operate the funeral homes as fifth generation funeral directors. The company now boasts three locations, and continues to provide service to the greater Cincinnati area.


History Of The 508th Parachute Infantry

Publication date 1948 Usage Public Domain Mark 1.0 Topics WWII, World War, 1939-1945, United States. Army, World War, 1939-1945 -- Regimental Histories -- United States, United States. -- Army -- Parachute Infantry Regiment, 508th, World War II, United States. -- Army -- Parachute Troops, United States. -- Army -- Airborne Division, 82nd, United States. Army. Parachute Infantry Regiment, 508th Publisher Washington, Infantry Journal Press Collection wwIIarchive additional_collections Language English

CONTENTS
FOREWORD X
PART ONE: PRELUDE TO COMBAT 1
PART TWO: NORMANDY 15
PART THREE: HOLLAND 39
PART FOUR: THE ARDENNES 59
PART FIVE: OCCUPATION 83
BATTLE CREDITS 101
HONOR ROLL 102
APPENDIX I: HIGHLIGHTS OF THE REGIMENTAL HISTORY 110
APPENDIX II: MEN KILLED IN TRAINING ACCIDENTS 110
APPENDIX III: BATTLE CASUALTIES 110
APPENDIX IV: COMBAT AWARDS 110
APPENDIX V: LIST OF COMBAT AWARDS 111
APPENDIX VI: BATTLEFIELD COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 111
APPENDIX VII: UNIT CITATIONS 116
MAPS
1: FLIGHT PLAN FOR THE NORMANDY DROP 18
2: THE NORMANDY DROP ZONES AND THE BEACHES 19
3: FROM STE. MERE EGLISE TO LA HAYE-DU-PUITS 28
4: HILLS 131 AND 95 36
5: FLIGHT PLAN FOR HOLLAND 41
6: THE HOLLAND DROP ZONES 44
7: THE 1ST BATTALION AT DEN HEUVEL 45
8: THE COUNTERATTACK AT DEN HEUVEL 48
9: NIJMEGEN AND THE CROSSING OF THE WAAL 53
10: THE TWO-MAN RECONNAISSANCE PATROL 56
11: THE REGIMENT ARRIVES IN THE ARDENNES 61
12: THE COUNTERATTACK FROM VIELSALM 64
13: THE ATTACK ON COMTfi 73
14: THE ADVANCE TO LOSHEIM 77
15: THE DRIVE TO THE ROER 80


Destroyer Escorts

Drawing 32/22D for the John C. Butler class destroyer escorts dated April 5, 1944. These Measure 32 colors were dull black (BK) and light gray (5-L ) while Measure 31 would have used dull black (BK) and ocean gray (5-O) or haze gray (5-H). Notice at the upper left, in an apparent attempt to reduce confusion, only the stern from knuckle to knuckle was shown in its own view. Even this still did not make clear whether the black panel was intended to be connected with the side panel on the starboard stern thus some ships painted a gap between these panels on the stern.

This design first appeared as a pattern for Measure 16 in June 1942. It was later drawn in December 1943 for the Fletcher and Allen M. Sumner classes of destroyers and later drawn for the Porter and Benson classes of destroyers. The battleship USS Missouri (BB-63) used Design 22D in Measure 32 colors of dull black, ocean gray and light gray. Design 22D was used for the Atlanta class light cruisers USS San Juan (CL-54) and USS Flint (CL-97). They were painted using Measure 32 in three colors, even though the drawing specified Measure 33 colors.


Gilligan’s Island Hawaii History On Oahu and Kauai

We were reminded recently of Gilligan’s Island due to the passing of actress Dawn Wells, who died of COVID in December. The former Miss America contestant Wells played Mary Ann Summers, the youngest in the cast of four men and three women. That leaves only one cast member remaining, Tina Louise, who played Ginger and is now 86 years old. For those of you old enough to remember, the iconic TV show comprised of nearly 100 episodes ran from 1964 to 1967 and is widely associated with Hawaii.

Be sure to watch the opening of the pilot episode we have featured at the end of this post. If you were a fan of the show, it’s really weird to see!

Gilligan’s Island | On Oahu and Kauai.

The opening scene of the series was filmed at Coconut Isle in Kaneohe Bay. Also known as Mokuoloe, and pictured below, the small island serves as a research facility for marine biology and is a short swim off of Oahu.

The island, now about 28 acres in size, was previously just 12 acres. In the 1930’s owner and Fleishmann yeast heir, Chris Holmes II, created more island using sand, coral rubble, and other landfills. He housed many pets. Later, during WW2, the island was a rest station for US Navy flyers. In the 1940s, it was purchased by a group wishing to create an exclusive and private resort, Coconut Island Club International. The concept failed, and in 1950, the 32-room Coconut Island Hotel opened. Part of the island had already donated to the University of Hawaii for marine research.

Series pilot and first episode filmed on Kauai.

Many think of the show being filmed here on Kauai, but that is not the case. Only the pilot was filmed on Kauai, at Moloaa Beach. The remaining episodes were at CBS in Studio City, California. Before settling on the Kauai location, Catalina Island was under consideration, but ultimately they chose Kauai for its tropical splendor and palm trees.

A rumor has existed that star Natalie Schafer, who played Lovey Howell, said she would only play millionaire Thurston Howell’s (played by Jim Backus) wife if she could have a free trip to Hawaii. In her later years, Dawn Wells was Natalie’s caretaker.

The crew arrived here on Kauai in November 1963, when the crew stayed at the iconic Coco Palms Hotel. They later stayed at the Hanalei Plantation Resort, which was also the location of Club Med.

The boat used for the SS Minnow was towed to Kauai from Honolulu for the filming.

If you ever watched the pilot episode, see below. There is a different theme song with a Calypso melody, and the roles of Ginger, Mary Ann, and the Professor did not exist. Instead, two secretaries and a high school teacher were played by different actors than in the series.

If you have any Gilligan’s Island trivia, be sure to comment.

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Criticisms Of Gilligan’s Theory

Some argue that Holstein’s study failed to provide unequivocal evidence for gender bias because, although some results did suggest a gender bias, other results did not.

Indeed, Gilligan’s claim that Kohlberg’s theory is gender biased has found little empirical support. Lawrence Walker’s (1984) empirical meta-analysis found that gender differences in moral reasoning stages are extremely rare: of 108 studies, only 8 showed clear gender effects, many of which were confounded by educational levels or occupational status. Likewise, James Rest’s (1979) meta-analysis also found that gender effects are extremely rare. Also, Walker (1989) found that most of the gender effects that have been reported are nonsignificant.


Watch the video: El rescate de la isla de Gilligan Así comienza (December 2021).